Non-profit

Murphy, Hesse, Toomey & Lehane, LLP, has decades of experience representing non-profits throughout New England.  We represent some of the largest non-profits in the region as well as many smaller organizations – our firm has the flexibility to provide for the needs of all non-profit entities.

We have extensive experience representing the following non-profit sectors:

  • Arts & Culture
  • Education & Youth
  • Environment
  • Health
  • Housing/Community Development
  • Human Services
  • Philanthropy

We represent these entities in a wide array of matters including:

  • Formation and incorporation
  • Tax exemption issues
  • Fiduciary duties
  • Board governance
  • Labor, employment and benefit plan issues
  • The relationship between public and private entities
  • Contract negotiations
  • Medicare and Medicaid compliance
  • Unrelated business taxable income issues/maintenance of non-profit status
  • Fundraising compliance issues
  • Department of education/student loan compliance issues

Our reasonable rates combined with our extensive experience in non-profit business law, employment and benefits law, and governmental law ensures that our non-profit clients receive the best possible representation designed to further the successes of their organizations.  We do well for those who do good.

For more information about our non-profit practice area, please contact: 

Katherine A. Hesse
617-479-5000
khesse@mhtl.com

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