Attorneys & Professionals

TEL: 617-479-5000
EMAIL: camara@mhtl.com

Ms. Amara practices in the areas of litigation, municipal and land use law.  She has represented municipalities in all phases of municipal law and litigation.  She regularly advises clients on a wide range of environmental, zoning, planning, conservation, wetlands, personnel issues, contracts, licensing, telecommunications, procurement, eminent domain, licensing, town meeting and governance issues.  She has counseled government officials and boards regarding their obligations under state ethics laws, public records laws and the Open Meeting Law.  Ms. Amara has litigated numerous cases before the Massachusetts state and federal trial and appellate courts and administrative agencies

Before focusing on a municipal law practice, Ms. Amara worked in both the public and private sectors, advising corporate and government entities on a wide range of complex environmental, land use, development, employment and corporate matters.

She is a member of the Massachusetts Bar Association and the Massachusetts City Solicitors and Town Counsel Association.  Ms. Amara is a graduate of Boston College (magna cum laude) and Boston College Law School (cum laude).

What's Happening @ MHTL?

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MHTL Appoints Charles Desmond to Advisory Board

Murphy, Hesse, Toomey & Lehane is pleased to announce that Dr. Charles F. Desmond, CEO of Inversant and a senior fellow at the New England Board of Higher Education, has accepted an appointment to the MHTL Advisory Board.

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Legal Updates

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Hazy Guidance for Employers: Attorney General Sessions Issues Marijuana Enforcement Memorandum to Federal Prosecutors

On January 4, 2018, Attorney General Jefferson Sessions issued a memorandum rescinding several Obama-era policies that discouraged federal prosecutors from pursuing marijuana possession and distribution cases in marijuana legalization states like Massachusetts. The Obama-era policies were backed by a Congressional budget rider that bars the Department of Justice from spending its money prosecuting state backed medical marijuana operations. The amendment will expire later this month, and it is unclear whether Congress will renew it given the Trump administration’s current priorities.

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